How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest

Okay, so I’m ALL for coming up with creative ways to engage customers online. In fact, as social media consultants we offer creative ideas and solutions every day. But, when does a creative contest simply become way too much work for the customer?

Companies are forever talking about the ROI of social media. But what about the customer’s return on investment of their time and energy?

Example: Dunkin Donuts Snap, Text & Tweet.

Take a close look at the steps below. Isn’t this a LOT to ask of the customer?

Map it out

When brainstorming contest ideas with your team and ways to engage the customer, try mapping out all the necessary steps AND potential drop out points. Then, look at the end return. Would you go through all this for a chance to win?

Thank you Shannan O. for sending this our way!

Your Turn
So how do YOU keep contests social and simple at the same time?

Deana Goldasich

Deana Goldasich, CEO and founder of Well Planned Web, plans and implements Content Marketing to help clients nurture leads, market their expertise and create an impactful presence online.

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23 Comments

  1. Anonymous on October 25, 2010 at 1:21 pm

    I see this all the time: big companies using social media to build ‘the list’ instead of using social media to be more social. Bad move.



  2. Deana Goldasich on October 26, 2010 at 4:06 pm

    Exactly! Your comment is a good reminder of the the reason WHY this one probably took the turn that it did. Thanks for your comment!



  3. Garrett Ira on October 27, 2010 at 3:25 am

    Ugh! DD has had some nice successes in social media. This is not one of them; what an absurd amount of steps. Clearly whoever is responsible for this focused exclusively on benefits for DD and not it’s participants. Big mistake.

    Perhaps between “tweeting the answer”, they should require that the participant call a 1-800 number, and post their answer on all of their friend’s walls 🙂



  4. Deana Goldasich on October 27, 2010 at 1:50 pm

    Hah! Good stuff, Garrett. I agree, DD usually does better than this in the social media world. I even hestitated to call it out, as I really DID see it as an exception. BUT, I saw a great example of how to map out steps required for customers. This illustrates how absurd it can really get and that it’s clearly not for the benefit of the customer. Thanks so much for your comment!



  5. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  6. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  7. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  8. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  9. NetWeave on November 3, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    @goldasich Still looking for good brands gone bad, eh?



  10. NetWeave on November 3, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    @goldasich Still looking for good brands gone bad, eh?



  11. NetWeave on November 3, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    @goldasich Still looking for good brands gone bad, eh?



  12. NetWeave on November 3, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    @goldasich Still looking for good brands gone bad, eh?



  13. NetWeave on November 3, 2010 at 5:04 pm

    @goldasich Still looking for good brands gone bad, eh?



  14. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    @netweave would’ve LOVED to have shared that one … but got to it afterward our @womenpowerup #ewntpa talk! Quite a hit on @socialmedia2day



  15. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    @netweave would’ve LOVED to have shared that one … but got to it afterward our @womenpowerup #ewntpa talk! Quite a hit on @socialmedia2day



  16. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    @netweave would’ve LOVED to have shared that one … but got to it afterward our @womenpowerup #ewntpa talk! Quite a hit on @socialmedia2day



  17. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    @netweave would’ve LOVED to have shared that one … but got to it afterward our @womenpowerup #ewntpa talk! Quite a hit on @socialmedia2day



  18. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm

    How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  19. goldasich on November 3, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    @netweave would’ve LOVED to have shared that one … but got to it afterward our @womenpowerup #ewntpa talk! Quite a hit on @socialmedia2day



  20. mintoparkside on November 4, 2010 at 12:14 am

    @goldasich Hey it’s our pleasure. Simplicity rules!



  21. goldasich on November 4, 2010 at 12:10 am

    @mintoparkside: Thanks for the RT of: How to Mutilate a Social Media Contest – http://www.wellplannedweb.com/2010/10/mu



  22. Mobarbq on March 15, 2011 at 2:08 pm

    Good post, Deana.

    Something else would seem to go without saying, but I’m afraid it needs to be said.
    If you sponsor a contest on social media, there is an underlying implication (read warranty) that you WILL fulfill the promotion, contest, etc.
    I personally have been “burned” four times now (by small businesses, typically) who seemingly are using Twitter just to drum up followers. They have a giveaway or contest and announce that you will win ‘such and such,’ and then you never receive anything from the company. No further communications, etc. They don’t ever check their “mentions” and they never follow anyone, so you can’t DM them. If you are lucky enough to find an email address for them, they will not answer you as to what’s up with the contest.
    I think this practice is poor business at the least, and outright fraud at the worst.



  23. Deana Goldasich on March 15, 2011 at 2:55 pm

    Thanks Mobarbq! Good points all around. I agree, there are some contest owners who are well organized and follow through. However, many appear chaotic and seeking the “sugar rush” of activity and new followers. It all comes down to planning. Without planning a process for follow up and communication–a contest will likely fall flat and disappoint.



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